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Connect and Thrive – Bend Oregon

Connect and Thrive on Thursday May 11 at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes.

We will explore the importance of social connections from the context of psychological research and hearing science. You will learn how hearing empowers social health and connections empower life!” Details below!

 

Connections Email 5

The Bend Oregon Hearing Tech Expo

Pacific Northwest Audiology had a full house in attendance at our Hearing Tech Expo on Wednesday, Feb 8, at the Mount Bachelor Village Conference Center.

Event Collage

Dr. Li began the day with a very well received talk on age-related hearing loss (her PhD thesis at the world renowned Karolinska Institutet in Sweden). The Doctor also reviewed new scientific studies which strongly linked untreated hearing loss and dementia. 

Dr. Odgear, also from Pacific Northwest Audiology, was the second batter, and he knocked it out of the ball park with his talk on hearing trends and the future of hearing tech. 

We convened for a hot lunch buffet, which consisted of Brisket of Beef Au Jus, baked beans, potato salad and a creamy coleslaw.  According to my polling, everyone thoroughly enjoyed the buffet!

We shook things up after lunch and reconvened in an adjacent room, which we had set up for interactive tech activities, led by Dr. Muto-Coleman from Resound. By the end of the session, everyone was able to put the pieces together…the past, present, and future of hearing tech.

Our next event will be the third week of May. Call Kat for early details at 541-678-5698

Hearing Aids Improve Brain Function

A new study, “The benefit of amplification on auditory working memory function in middle-aged and young-older hearing impaired adults,” by Jamie Desjardins, PhD, an assistant professor in the Speech-Language Pathology Program at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), found that hearing aids improve brain function in mature adults with hearing loss.

Texas study, hearing aids restore cognition

Previous Studies

Previous studies have shown that untreated hearing loss is associated with serious emotional, medical, and social consequences, including unnatural mental decline and dementia. These disabilities often result in reduced job performance, lower income, and a generally diminished quality of life. Declining cognitive function is also associated with a loss of auditory working memory, the ability to pay attention to conversations in noisy environments. Working memory is important because it is critical for understanding speech.

Sustained hearing loss causes problems because the brain must allocate extra resources to the task of understanding speech. When this occurs, other areas of the brain associated with cognitive functions are “starved”.

As Desjardins explained, “If you have some hearing impairment and you’re not using hearing aids, maybe you can figure out what the person has said, but that comes with a cost. You may actually be using the majority of your cognitive resources, your brain power, in order to figure out that message.”

Purpose Of  The UTEP Study

As we age, our thinking and memory skills naturally decline. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of hearing aid use on the auditory working memories of middle-aged and young-older adults with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Sensorineural Hearing loss is caused by damage to the inner ear or the nerve from the ear to the brain, and isn’t typically correctable with surgery. The study included 24 adults in their 50s and 60s with bilateral (involving both ears) hearing loss who had never before used hearing aids. 

Cognitive skill trends can be measured by changes in working memory, the ability to process information during conversations. For the present study, cognitive tests were used to measure the working memory, selective attention, and speech processing speed of study participants before and after wearing hearing aids. 

Study Results: Hearing Aids Improve Cognitive Function

Results from this study indicated significant improvements in the auditory working memory of participants after 6 weeks of hearing aid use. Why is this important? Using hearing aids in the early stages of age-related hearing loss, even mild hearing loss, can have a positive impact on working memory performance. 

According to Desjardins, “Most people will experience hearing loss in their lifetime. Think about somebody who is still working and they’re not wearing hearing aids and they are spending so much of their brainpower just trying to focus on listening. They may not be able to perform their job as well. Or if they can, they’re exhausted because they are working so much harder. They are more tired at the end of the day and it’s a lot more taxing. It affects their quality of life.”

An Allied Study

Another study recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research in Bordeaux France found that “Use of hearing aids attenuates cognitive decline in elderly people with hearing loss”. 

The bottom line of this study? Hearing aids appear to have a positive effect on thinking and memory functions, by restoring communication abilities and promoting social interaction, qualities that are known to reduce isolation and resulting depression.

Final Comments

Hearing impairment is one of the most common health problems in the United States. It affects more than 9 million Americans over the age of 65 and 10 million Americans between 45 and 64, but only 1 in 5 people who need hearing aids actually wear them. That means 4 in 5 people with hearing loss are tossing dice that only allow bad outcomes.

Our take-away from these studies? We have choices and those choices effect the way we live. We urge older adults with hearing loss to seek qualified treatment by a Doctor of Audiology.

Patient-Centered Hearing-Health Care vs. Sales-Centered Hearing Care

The Bottom Line

The following table compares the professional business model, represented by doctor-level audiologist such as those working at Pacific Northwest Audiology, and the corporate business model, represented by “Big Box”, manufacturing, and franchise retailers.

The bottom line is that when you select a hearing care provider you also accept their business model…and the consequences of that model. You can choose patient-centered hearing-health care by a Doctor of Audiology, or volume sales-centered care by a technician.

Given the increasing evidence linking medical, emotional, and social consequences to hearing loss, we hope the table guides you to your best choice for a hearing provider.

 

AuD vs. Dispenser table 3

Hearing Aids Can Prevent Mental Decline

Hearing Aids prevent cognitive decline

An increasing number of research efforts are linking untreated hearing loss to thinking and memory problems, including dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Many of these studies indicate that hearing aids should be used as early as hearing loss symptoms can be verified, but evidence supporting hearing aids as a preventive therapy have been largely theoretical. That has changed recently, with new research just published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research in Bordeaux France. The study followed 3,670 adults, age 65 and older over a 25-year period.

The main findings of this ground-breaking research indicate that “Use of hearing aids attenuates cognitive decline in elderly people with hearing loss”. The study found that people treated with hearing aids for their hearing loss showed the same rate of cognitive decline as a control group with no prior hearing loss. As a contrast, people with untreated hearing loss scored significantly lower baseline scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), a well-established test for determining cognitive function.

The bottom line? Hearing aids appear to have a positive effect on thinking and memory functions, by restoring communication abilities and promoting social interaction, qualities that are known to reduce isolation and resulting depression.

What does this mean to an aging population? “These results argue in favor of screening and rehabilitation of hearing disorders in elderly people,” said Prof. Amieva, a leading researcher in the Neuropsychology and Epidemiology of Aging at the University of Bordeaux, France. “We now have a set of data that is sufficiently robust to assert that hearing loss induces accelerated cognitive decline in the elderly, and hearing aids can attenuate this decline.”

Dr. Li-Korotky, AuD, PhD, F-AAA , is Board Certified in Audiology, and CEO of Pacific Northwest Audiology.

Hearing Loss Linked to Dementia

A Cautionary Tale

Mounting evidence has established a  strong link between untreated hearing loss and diminished cognitive function, including dementia. Studies also link untreated hearing loss to other medical and emotional problems, including depression.

This is a cautionary tale, but a light shines brightly to guide our passage away from danger: Hearing Loss Can End Badly—but we have options!

First, the bad news. Mounting evidence has established a strong link between untreated hearing loss (HL) and diminished cognitive function, accelerated mental decline, rapid rates of brain tissue loss, and other disabling conditions, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. People who don’t hear well tend to withdraw from social activities, and that can lead to depression and early mortality.

The link between HL and dementia is reinforced by statistical and brain scan studies from hearing and social neuroscience research, and backed by compelling theories for how HL promotes dementia.

Dr. Frank Lin from John Hopkins Medicine has identified three primary pathways to dementia and other bad health outcomes:

  1. HL increases the cognitive load on the brain. Struggling to understand speech causes the brain to focus on sound processing at the expense of memory, thinking, and learning processes. Robbing Peter to pay Paul leads to a cascade of bad consequences, leaving seniors vulnerable to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
  2. Even mild HL hastens brain tissue loss, and seniors with untreated hearing problems are much more susceptible to brain tissue loss and other unwanted brain structural changes than seniors with normal hearing. This is significant because the brain tissue loss occurs where memory and sensory integration are processed, causing a negative feedback loop that leaves seniors vulnerable to dementia.
  3. People who can’t hear well tend to avoid social engagement. This puts them at a higher risk for becoming socially isolated, lonely, and depressed—and that exposes them to a perfect storm for developing dementia and early death.

Now the good news: new research just published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by researchers at the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research in Bordeaux, France found that hearing aids reduce the threat of accelerated cognitive decline. The Bordeaux study revealed that elderly people with HL who used hearing aids were spared the augmented levels of cognitive decline suffered by others with HL who didn’t use hearing aids.

Social neuroscience research found similar results

Dr. Cacioppo is the Director of the Center for Cognitive & Social Neuroscience and Chair of the Social Psychology Program at the University of Chicago. Decades of research inform the doctor that we are social by design. That means we are hard wired to connect with others. In fact, our need for social interaction is as fundamental as our need for food and water because the consequent social behaviors helped us survive & reproduce.

Highlights from social neuroscience research:

  • Socially connected people are more likely to have good physical health and psychological well-being.
  • People with strong social networks generally live longer. They also have lower rates of anxiety and depression.
  • Forming strong social bonds creates a positive feedback loop of social, emotional and physical well-being.
  • Conversely, lack of social bonding often contributes to a negative feedback loop of isolation, deep loneliness, and antisocial behavior, often leading to bad health outcomes for aging adults, including depression and dementia!

But you can’t connect with people if you can’t hear them, so it is vitally important that hearing and communication problems aren’t keeping you from a socially rewarding life.The bottom line? Hearing empowers social health and social health empower life!

See our Brochure on Hearing Loss and Dementia, here

 

Breaking News - Hearing Aids prevent Dementia study

 

Noise-induced Hearing Loss

When Noise Hurts

Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is irreversible hearing damage resulting from exposure to high levels of noise. NIHL affects an estimated 10 to 15 million people in the USA, making excessive noise exposure the most common cause of hearing loss.

What causes NIHL? Exposure to traumatic noise will cause permanent damage to the sensitive hair cells of the inner ear and possibly the hearing nerve.

NIHL is related to both noise intensity and the duration of exposure. Louder sounds require shorter exposures before damage occurs. Why? Because a 10 dB increase in sound level causes a 10 fold increase in sound intensity.

This means that the sound of an MP3 player set at a volume of 115 dB is about 1000 times more intense than a vacuum cleaner sound volume of 85 dB, and a Rock concert can produce sounds (120 dB) that are 100 times more intense than a lawnmower (100 dB)!

NIHL is Permanent. It can be treated to some extent (depending on the damage), but it can’t be reversed!

See our Brochure on Noise-induced hearing loss, here

Untreated Hearing Loss

The consequences can be severe but treatment offers hope!

Untreated hearing loss has been linked to disabling medical conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and cardiovascular disease. Studies and observational evidence indicate that untreated hearing loss can damage your physical, emotional, and social health and well being.

Your family, friends, and others will not escape these changes. In a very real sense they will share the unwanted consequences of your hearing loss.

The good news is that the worst effects of hearing loss can be moderated with hearing aids, cochlear implants and post-fitting rehabilitation. When people with mild-to-profound hearing loss use hearing aids, they experience less depression, less anxiety, and less emotional stress… while showing significant improvements in their quality of life and well-being.

Given the undesirable consequences of untreated hearing loss, it would be a good idea to get a hearing exam by a well qualified Audiologist, especially if you suspect that you are developing hearing problems. Being more safe than sorry has real meaning when the consequences of inaction are potentially so severe.

See our Brochure on Untreated Hearing Loss, here

Age-related Hearing Loss (ARHL)

The ‘baby boom’ generation is aging. In 2009, people over 65 represented 12.9% of the population, but by 2030, they will be 19.3%. From the Administration on Aging, the number of Americans over 65 is expected to double between 2008 and 2030 to around 72 million.

Why should we be concerned? Because Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition among older adults! According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, hearing loss increases with age. Approximately one third of Americans between 65 and 74 and nearly half of those over 75 have hearing and communication problems.

What is Age-related Hearing Loss? ARHL is a gradual and progressive hearing loss that affects most people as they age. Due to the slow progression, adults with ARHL may not realize that their hearing and communication abilities are declining, or they may accept it as a normal part of aging.

ARHL has serious consequences for the elderly because it diminishes their ability to communicate and reduces their functional independence.

See the complete article on age-related hearing loss here

 

Age-Related Hearing Loss (ARHL)

Seeds of a Growing Problem

The population of the U.S. is getting older. According to the Administration on Aging, the aging ‘baby boom’ generation will produce a dramatic increase in the population through 2030. In 2009, people over 65 represented 12.9% of the population, but by 2030, they will represent 19.3%. The population over 65 is expected to double between 2008 and 2030 to a projected 72.1 million.

Why should we be concerned with an Aging Population? Because Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition among older adults! According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), 36 million Americans have impaired hearing, including 17% of our adult population. The occurrence of hearing loss increases with age. Approximately one third of Americans between 65 and 74 and nearly half of those over 75 have hearing and communication problems.

The Symptoms and Progress of ARHL

ARHL (also known as presbycusis) is a gradual and progressive hearing loss that affects most individuals as they age. Due to the slow progression, adults with ARHL may not realize that their hearing is diminishing …but if they do …they may accept it as normal aging. ARHL has a serious impact on the elderly because it diminishes their ability to communicate and reduces their functional independence. This limits their opportunities to participate effectively in their daily lives.

To those with ARHL, sounds often seem less clear and lower in volume. Muted murky sounds make it increasingly difficult to hear and understanding speech. Individuals with ARHL may experience several of the following:

  • The speech of others may seem mumbled or slurred.
  • It may become difficult to distinguish high-pitched sounds such as “s” and “th”.
  • Conversations become difficult to understand, especially when there is background noise.
  • A man’s voice may become easier to hear than the higher pitches of a woman’s voice.
  • Certain sounds may seem annoying or too loud.
  • Tinnitus (a ringing, roaring, or hissing sound in one or both ears) may develop.

Is ARHL the Same for Men and Women?

ARHL typically begins with high frequency hearing loss (degeneration of the hair cells lining the bottom of the Cochlea) and later affects the lower frequencies (apex of the Cochlea) as well. Paradoxically, several research studies indicate that while men develop high frequency hearing loss with age, women tend to have more problems discerning lower frequencies (250-1000Hz), possibly due to biologic factors such as hormones, or cardiovascular disease events (CVD) such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. While low-frequency hearing loss is related to CVD events in both genders, women tend to show this relationship more than men on audiograms. The figure (above) shows the gender reversal pattern, using average audiograms of 341 males and 346 females aged 50-89 years (Journal of the American Academy of Audiology (1993;4:42-49).

Although precise causes for this pattern require more research, the bottom line is that women with ARHL have more problems with low-pitched vowel sounds (o, a, ah, i, e), and men have more problems with high-pitched consonant sounds (d, t, sh, s, f, th). Since the softer high-pitched consonant sounds carry the meaning of speech, those (especially men) with pronounced high-frequency hearing loss often have problems understanding what is being said, especially in an environment with background noise.

About the Author

Dr. Li-Korotky is a nationally acclaimed research scientist and clinician, and the President of Pacific Northwest Audiology in Bend OR. The Doctor earned an MD with an emphasis in otology and otolaryngology, a PhD in audiology with a thesis on Age-Related Hearing Loss, and a Clinical Doctor of Audiology degree (AuD).